This Guy Wants to Make Abercrombie the 'No. 1 Brand of Homeless Apparel'

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Everybody, meet Greg Karber. The Los Angeles-based writer was pretty disgusted — as were we — when he read this rant by Abercrombie and Fitch C.E.O. Michael Jeffries, which was originally published in a 2006 Salon interview, but recently resurfaced in a Business Insider story.

It goes:

"In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then there are the not-so-cool kids. Candidly, we go after the cool kids. We go after the attractive all-American kid with a great attitude and a lot of friends. A lot of people don't belong [in our clothes], and they can't belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely."

And while Jeffries's words (and Abercrombie's policy of burning excess stock, rather than donating it) have inspired Change.org petitions, Karber decided to protest in a more...immediate way.

So, he filmed himself visiting a thrift store, buying up every item of Abercrombie & Fitch clothing in sight, going to to Skid Row, and giving the clothing to the homeless men and women he found there. Karber says his goal is to turn Abercrombie into "the world's number one brand of homeless apparel," and he even launched a Twitter campaign with the hashtag #FitchtheHomeless.

And, while the video has attracted tons of attention, something about it is definitely...off. The men and women Karber filmed don't really get the chance to say anything — the clip is completely narrated by Karber, in a voice-over. Plus, when Karber approaches them, as if he's about to give them something, they look visibly disappointed to see him hand over rugby shirts and distressed jeans rather than necessities, like — oh, I don't know — money or food.

See for yourself, below.

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